Jessica Borbasi

Research Associate

Jessica Borbasi

Expertise: Health, Medicine

Jessica is working as a Research Associate in the Health Innovative Program. She is currently undertaking a research report exploring death and dying in Australia, with a focus on palliative care.

Jessica completed a Bachelor of Psychological Sciences with Honours at UQ and a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at Flinders University during which she spent time as a medical student in rural Australia. She has since worked as a clinician in South Australia, and NSW recently completing her Basic Physicians Training at Royal North Shore Hospital. These experiences sparked an interest in health policy, hospital administration and health economics for which she is currently undertaking a Masters of Public Health and Health Management at UNSW.

Together with some self-taught classical liberalism Jessica is always keen to discuss politics, health and what medicine may look like in the future.


Featured Publication

Media & Commentary

  • The facts of death 08 June 2018 | Ideas@TheCentre
    How is it that one man travelling abroad to end his life dominates the headlines but there is nothing to be said of the 115,000 Australians who die each year without access to adequate end-of-life care? Often, euthanasia eclipses all…
    How is it that one man travelling abroad to end his life dominates the headlines but there is nothing to be said of the 115,000 Australians who die each year without access to adequate end-of-life care? Often, euthanasia eclipses all…
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  • AMA’s turf war won’t win the war on pain 31 January 2018 | THE AUSTRALIAN
    We didn’t need another demonstration of how out of touch the AMA is with the broader medical profession and the society they serve — but we got one any way. In response to the proposed $20 million dollar trial for…
    We didn’t need another demonstration of how out of touch the AMA is with the broader medical profession and the society they serve — but we got one any way. In response to the proposed $20 million dollar trial for…
    read more
  • The doctor will ask you now 08 December 2017 | IDEAS@THECENTRE
    In light of nocebo and the potential harm from information,  doctors are being advised to heed caution before cautioning their patients.
    In light of nocebo and the potential harm from information,  doctors are being advised to heed caution before cautioning their patients.
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  • Life before death 24 November 2017 | Ideas@TheCentre
    The end isn’t inevitably nigh but it is the end. For all the doomsday discussions about death what we have failed to consider is life — life in the years, months and weeks before death. An average Australian in their…
    The end isn’t inevitably nigh but it is the end. For all the doomsday discussions about death what we have failed to consider is life — life in the years, months and weeks before death. An average Australian in their…
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  • Cancel the one-way tickets to Victoria 21 November 2017 | The Spectator; Flat White
    It is a sad reality that perfectly well older Australians are looking into their futures and finding solace in the potential of physician-assisted suicide. Irrespective of what this says about our society and our care of the elderly, the death…
    It is a sad reality that perfectly well older Australians are looking into their futures and finding solace in the potential of physician-assisted suicide. Irrespective of what this says about our society and our care of the elderly, the death…
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Publications

  • Life Before Death: Improving Palliative Care for Older Australians 19 November 2017 | RR34
    The notion that the problems associated with modern death and dying can be solved simply by allowing more Australians to die at home is an oversimplification. Moreover, the myth that most people want to die at home, but don’t, has also unhelpfully reinforced the popular fear that grim, distressing, painful…...
    The notion that the problems associated with modern death and dying can be solved simply by allowing more Australians to die at home is an oversimplification. Moreover, the myth that most people want to die at home, but don’t, has also unhelpfully reinforced the popular fear that grim, distressing, painful…
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