Contributors – The Centre for Independent Studies

Kayoko Tsumori


Media & Commentary

  • Dismissal Law Benefits the Long-term Unemployed 18 March 2003 | The Australian Financial Review
    Employment prospects for the long-term unemployed remain bleak, as the Senate is expected to reject the Fair Dismissal Bill yet again as early as this week. The Bill is intended to exempt small businesses from unfair dismissal laws. Unfair dismissal…
    Employment prospects for the long-term unemployed remain bleak, as the Senate is expected to reject the Fair Dismissal Bill yet again as early as this week. The Bill is intended to exempt small businesses from unfair dismissal laws. Unfair dismissal…
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  • Pay increases don't help the unemployed 05 December 2002 | The Australian Financial Review
    A few weeks ago, the Australian Council of Trade Unions announced yet another 'living wage' claim. It plans to seek, in 2003, a $24.60 per week pay rise for all award workers, bringing the minimum wage to $456.00. The living…
    A few weeks ago, the Australian Council of Trade Unions announced yet another 'living wage' claim. It plans to seek, in 2003, a $24.60 per week pay rise for all award workers, bringing the minimum wage to $456.00. The living…
    read more
  • Only deregulation can create jobs 21 October 2002 | The Australian Financial Review
    The unemployment rate in August 2002 stood at 6.2%—a high figure considering continuing economic growth. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there were 622,700 unemployed people, but only 100,800 job vacancies, in Australia that month. Simple math—622,700 divided by…
    The unemployment rate in August 2002 stood at 6.2%—a high figure considering continuing economic growth. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there were 622,700 unemployed people, but only 100,800 job vacancies, in Australia that month. Simple math—622,700 divided by…
    read more
  • Unfair dismissal laws deter firing and hiring 26 August 2002 | The Australian Financial Review
    Joblessness is a major cause of poverty. Getting the poor into work is therefore the key to alleviating poverty. The problem, however, is that there appear to be too few jobs. Persistent unemployment points to a shortage of jobs. The…
    Joblessness is a major cause of poverty. Getting the poor into work is therefore the key to alleviating poverty. The problem, however, is that there appear to be too few jobs. Persistent unemployment points to a shortage of jobs. The…
    read more
  • Poverty lines tangled: An influential report claiming that one in eight Australians lives in poverty is wrong 17 January 2002 | The Age
    Our paper, Poor Arguments: A Response to the Smith Family Report on Poverty in Australia – questioning the claims that one in eight Australians is living in poverty today, and that poverty has risen in the last decade – attracted…
    Our paper, Poor Arguments: A Response to the Smith Family Report on Poverty in Australia – questioning the claims that one in eight Australians is living in poverty today, and that poverty has risen in the last decade – attracted…
    read more

Publications

  • The Road to Work: Freeing Up the Labour Market 15 July 2005 | PM64
    This monograph outlines a framework for a more flexible, deregulated labour market which could strengthen employment, raise living standards and promote workers' wellbeing.
    This monograph outlines a framework for a more flexible, deregulated labour market which could strengthen employment, raise living standards and promote workers' wellbeing.
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  • How Union Campaigns on Hours and Casuals are Threatening Low-skilled Jobs 22 January 2004 | IA44
    For several years now Australian unions have been waging campaigns to limit working hours and the growth in casual employment in the name of improving workers’ well-being. Yet these campaigns are little more than an attempt to impose uniform rules on the entire workforce, thereby discouraging workers from opting out…...
    For several years now Australian unions have been waging campaigns to limit working hours and the growth in casual employment in the name of improving workers’ well-being. Yet these campaigns are little more than an attempt to impose uniform rules on the entire workforce, thereby discouraging workers from opting out…
    READ MORE
  • Poor Laws (3) How to Reform the Award System and Create More Jobs 10 November 2003 | IA41
    Despite the hype about enterprise bargaining and the individualisation of employment arrangements since the early 1990s, the award system continues to play a significant role in Australia’s industrial relations. This is because awards serve as the basis for many non-award agreements. An award – a legally enforceable document that sets…...
    Despite the hype about enterprise bargaining and the individualisation of employment arrangements since the early 1990s, the award system continues to play a significant role in Australia’s industrial relations. This is because awards serve as the basis for many non-award agreements. An award – a legally enforceable document that sets…
    READ MORE
  • Is the ‘Earnings Credit’ the Best Way to Cut the Dole Queues? 13 May 2003 | IA35
    To combat joblessness and welfare dependency, the ‘Five Economists’ in October 1998 proposed a temporary minimum wage freeze and the introduction of ‘in-work benefits’. The rationale is that, while a minimum wage freeze boosts employment opportunities for the jobless, in-work benefits – a tax break for low-income families of which…...
    To combat joblessness and welfare dependency, the ‘Five Economists’ in October 1998 proposed a temporary minimum wage freeze and the introduction of ‘in-work benefits’. The rationale is that, while a minimum wage freeze boosts employment opportunities for the jobless, in-work benefits – a tax break for low-income families of which…
    READ MORE
  • Poor Laws (2): The Minimum Wage and Unemployment 02 December 2002 | IA28
    Many social policy researchers and practitioners in Australia believe that a high minimum wage helps alleviate poverty. But a high minimum wage provides no relief for the majority of poor households that are jobless and therefore receive no wage. A high minimum wage, furthermore, destroys employment opportunities for, and thereby…...
    Many social policy researchers and practitioners in Australia believe that a high minimum wage helps alleviate poverty. But a high minimum wage provides no relief for the majority of poor households that are jobless and therefore receive no wage. A high minimum wage, furthermore, destroys employment opportunities for, and thereby…
    READ MORE
  • Poor Laws (1): The Unfair Dismissal Laws and Long-term Unemployment 20 August 2002 | IA26
    Joblessness is a major cause of poverty. Poverty will be alleviated significantly by engaging the poor in gainful employment. Yet persistent unemployment, especially persistent long-term unemployment, suggests that there may be too few jobs to pursue such a policy option. Despite strong economic growth over the past near-decade, Australia’s unemployment…...
    Joblessness is a major cause of poverty. Poverty will be alleviated significantly by engaging the poor in gainful employment. Yet persistent unemployment, especially persistent long-term unemployment, suggests that there may be too few jobs to pursue such a policy option. Despite strong economic growth over the past near-decade, Australia’s unemployment…
    READ MORE
  • Poor Arguments: A Response to the Smith Family Report on Poverty in Australia 16 January 2002 | IA21
    A recent Smith Family/NATSEM report claims that poverty in Australia increased during the 1990s and that nearly one in eight Australians is in poverty today. This claim, which attracted extensive media coverage when the report was released last December, is dubious because it involves a confusion of the two distinct…...
    A recent Smith Family/NATSEM report claims that poverty in Australia increased during the 1990s and that nearly one in eight Australians is in poverty today. This claim, which attracted extensive media coverage when the report was released last December, is dubious because it involves a confusion of the two distinct…
    READ MORE