Economic Policy

The Centre for Independent Studies is guided by the philosophy of free markets and individual responsibility. Our economic policy research centres on ideas that will strengthen Australia’s economy for the future and challenge the reach of big government. With ongoing uncertainty for economies around the world, the CIS’ research into financial and monetary issues is more vital than ever in helping shape public policy.

Continuing economic reform is desperately needed in Australia, and that is why our TARGET30 program seeks to reduce waste in government and in the public sector, and to bring government spending under control.

For more information on our economic research, please proceed to:

Featured Publication

Publications

Submission to IPART Review of Social and Affordable Housing Rent Models
Michael Potter
15 May 2017 | CIS Submission

In April, IPART released a draft report into models for setting social and affordable housing rent. The CIS submission on the IPART draft argues for reforms including: All new social housing tenants, and all existing tenants who wish to move, should be provided with informed…

Fiscal Fiction: The Real Medicare Levy
Jeremy Sammut
07 May 2017 | RR27

The Medicare Levy is, and always has been, a fiscal fiction. The revenue raised by the levy is not ‘hypothecated’ – dedicated specifically to fund Medicare – but goes into general government revenue. Moreover, the amount of revenue raised by the levy accounts for a…

Submission to Senate Economics Committee Inquiry into Corporate Tax Avoidance
Michael Potter
19 April 2017 | CIS Submission

Corporate tax avoidance is an issue of some concern to the Australian community. However, many assertions made in the debate about tax avoidance are not supported by evidence; such as statements that company tax avoidance is widespread. Instead, the evidence shows that company tax revenue…

Comments on ‘Better Budgeting Discussion Paper’
Robert Carling, Michael Potter
13 April 2017 | CIS Submission

The following comments are offered in response to the call for submissions on the ‘Better Budgeting Discussion Paper’ issued by Jim Chalmers MP in February 2017. The comments represent the views of the authors and not necessarily those of The Centre for Independent Studies.

Real Choice for Ageing Australians: Achieving the Benefits of the Consumer-Directed Aged Care Reforms in the New Economy
Jeremy Sammut
09 April 2017 | RR24

The consumer-directed aged care (CDC) reforms are an important opportunity to showcase the benefits of market-based reforms to often sceptical and change-averse members of the public. Given the broader implications, this report warns that the CDC reforms could fall short of their promise and fail to…

Media & Commentary

One impact of the budget: sales of white flags are booming
Michael Potter
19 May 2017 | The Spectator - Flat White

Sales of white flags are going gangbusters, with the Coalition buying out supplies. It isn’t surprising, as they’ve found so many things to wave a white flag over. There’s been…

How we got stuck in the spending ratchet
Simon Cowan
16 May 2017 | Australian Financial Review

If you were digging for a positive spin on the broader fiscal strategy in the budget, the best you could say is that the government is committed to achieving a…

Budget 2017: a housing policy shambles
Michael Potter
12 May 2017 | The Spectator - Flat White

The housing measures in the 2017 Budget present a great case study in how expectations can be mismanaged. The government unwisely created anticipation that it would ‘solve’ housing affordability, then…

What the bank levy says about the budget
Robert Carling
12 May 2017 | Ideas@TheCentre

The new levy on selected liabilities — mainly borrowings and non-guaranteed deposits — of selected banks (the big four and Macquarie) is an unexpected tax grab of at least $1.5…

Inflated expectations
Michael Potter
12 May 2017 | Ideas@TheCentre

The Budget measures relating to housing are a case study in how to fail in meeting expectations. The government unwisely generated, then inflated, expectations that there would be major solutions…