Trisha Jha

Policy Analyst

Expertise: Child care policy, social policy, families, classical liberal ideas

Trisha was a researcher in the Social Foundations Program and has been specialising in policy relating to family payments, childcare and has recently been working with Research Fellow Jennifer Buckingham in the education policy area. Their latest report released in 2016 is called One School Does Not Fit All. Earlier reports were Complex Family Payments: What it Costs the Village to Raise a Child and Regulating for Quality in Childcare: The Evidence Base.

Trisha was a regular commentator on radio and has appeared on the ABC Q&A and other programs.

She holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations from the Australian National University. She has a strong interest in classical liberal ideas and has been actively involved writing and debating the issues of the day.

 


Featured Publication

  • Early Childhood Intervention: Assessing the evidence 20 September 2016 | Research Report 19
    Early childhood interventions are programs that aim to improve a child’s development trajectory over the longer term. In the context of increasing disadvantage in welfare-dependent communities in Australia, governments spend considerable sums on these programs. The rationale is that investment,…...
    Early childhood interventions are programs that aim to improve a child’s development trajectory over the longer term. In the context of increasing disadvantage in welfare-dependent communities in Australia, governments spend considerable sums on these programs. The rationale is that investment,…
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Media & Commentary

  • When the rubber hits the road 11 November 2016 | Ideas@TheCentre
    Think-tankers cop a lot of flack. Australian think tanks don’t loom quite as large in the public sphere as they do in other, larger countries — where they are often derided as some combination of the following: denizens of an…
    Think-tankers cop a lot of flack. Australian think tanks don’t loom quite as large in the public sphere as they do in other, larger countries — where they are often derided as some combination of the following: denizens of an…
    read more
  • Spectator Diary 28 October 2016 | The Spectator
    Spring returned to Sydney for the long weekend, just in time for me to spend three days incarcerated indoors packing for a house move — and topping that entertainment off with an appearance on ABC’s Q&A. The show’s cautious producers…
    Spring returned to Sydney for the long weekend, just in time for me to spend three days incarcerated indoors packing for a house move — and topping that entertainment off with an appearance on ABC’s Q&A. The show’s cautious producers…
    read more
  • In defence of millennials 28 October 2016 | Ideas@TheCentre
    I’m under no illusions about the CIS demographic, so I know this is a provocative topic for this newsletter. After all, aren’t millennials busy complaining about house prices in one breath and bemoaning developers in the next — in between…
    I’m under no illusions about the CIS demographic, so I know this is a provocative topic for this newsletter. After all, aren’t millennials busy complaining about house prices in one breath and bemoaning developers in the next — in between…
    read more
  • It’s time for me to face the truth – I am no longer a feminist 14 October 2016 | The Spectator - Flat White
    This is a big deal for someone who was heavily involved with the Women’s Collective at university and helped to organise SlutWalk Canberra in 2011 (though I attended armed with a John Stuart Mill-inspired placard). It’s been a long time…
    This is a big deal for someone who was heavily involved with the Women’s Collective at university and helped to organise SlutWalk Canberra in 2011 (though I attended armed with a John Stuart Mill-inspired placard). It’s been a long time…
    read more
  • Trouble brewing for childcare 07 October 2016 | Ideas@TheCentre
    Just as the Education Minister has disabled the landmine that was Labor’s troubled VET fee help scheme, he’s having to deal with the news of rorting on a massive scale in family day care (FDC). Now, I confess that a…
    Just as the Education Minister has disabled the landmine that was Labor’s troubled VET fee help scheme, he’s having to deal with the news of rorting on a massive scale in family day care (FDC). Now, I confess that a…
    read more

Publications

  • Productivity Commission Inquiry Into Introducing Competition and Informed User Choice into Human Services: Submission in response to issues paper 01 July 2016 | CIS Submission
    The Human Services Inquiry is ‘examining policy options in the human services sector that incorporate the principles of competition, contestability and informed user choice’. This submission puts the case that such policies have the potential to improve quality, equity, efficiency, and accountability and responsiveness in school education through expanding competition,…...
    The Human Services Inquiry is ‘examining policy options in the human services sector that incorporate the principles of competition, contestability and informed user choice’. This submission puts the case that such policies have the potential to improve quality, equity, efficiency, and accountability and responsiveness in school education through expanding competition,…
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  • Untangling childcare and family policy 05 March 2016
    Speech given by CIS Policy Analyst Trisha Jha to the NSW Liberal Party’s Rural and Regional Lunch on Saturday March 5, 2015. Thank you to Tobias and Hollie for inviting me to address you all this afternoon. I’d like to give you a bit of an introduction to the organisation I…...
    Speech given by CIS Policy Analyst Trisha Jha to the NSW Liberal Party’s Rural and Regional Lunch on Saturday March 5, 2015. Thank you to Tobias and Hollie for inviting me to address you all this afternoon. I’d like to give you a bit of an introduction to the organisation I…
    READ MORE
  • One School Does Not Fit All 31 January 2016 | Research Report 9
    Australia has a relatively large degree of choice between schools, a product of historical private and non-profit sector involvement in the provision of schooling after British colonisation. Analysis of school funding data in this report shows that there are more similarities in how schools are funded than differences. This report…...
    Australia has a relatively large degree of choice between schools, a product of historical private and non-profit sector involvement in the provision of schooling after British colonisation. Analysis of school funding data in this report shows that there are more similarities in how schools are funded than differences. This report…
    READ MORE
  • Free to Choose Charter Schools: How charter and for-profit schools can boost public education 31 August 2015 | Research Report 6
    Charter schools and free schools – publicly-funded, privately-managed schools – have been introduced in several countries around the world as a way of extending school choice, particularly for low income families. This report examines the policies and research on charter schools and their equivalents in five countries –USA, Sweden, Chile,…...
    Charter schools and free schools – publicly-funded, privately-managed schools – have been introduced in several countries around the world as a way of extending school choice, particularly for low income families. This report examines the policies and research on charter schools and their equivalents in five countries –USA, Sweden, Chile,…
    READ MORE
  • Regulating for Quality in Childcare: The Evidence Base 05 November 2014 | PM142
    The National Quality Agenda (NQA) endorsed by all states and territories in 2009 regulates childcare systems across Australia. It mandates increased minimum standards in various aspects provision of care and a ratings system with the goal of improving quality. The NQA mandates substantial and costly reforms to staff-to-child ratios and…...
    The National Quality Agenda (NQA) endorsed by all states and territories in 2009 regulates childcare systems across Australia. It mandates increased minimum standards in various aspects provision of care and a ratings system with the goal of improving quality. The NQA mandates substantial and costly reforms to staff-to-child ratios and…
    READ MORE
  • Complex Family Payments: What it Costs the Village to Raise a Child 06 August 2014 | PM141
    In 2013–14, $32 billion was spent on family payments, amounting to 7.7% of total federal expenditure in that year, and 22% of total federal spending on social security and welfare. Family Tax Benefits (FTB) and child care fee assistance are the two areas in which spending is the most significant…...
    In 2013–14, $32 billion was spent on family payments, amounting to 7.7% of total federal expenditure in that year, and 22% of total federal spending on social security and welfare. Family Tax Benefits (FTB) and child care fee assistance are the two areas in which spending is the most significant…
    READ MORE
  • Budget 2014-15: Fiscal responsibility or savage cuts? 16 May 2014 | SP13
    The CIS analyses the Abbott government’s crucial first budget, including significant changes in the key policy areas of health, tax measures, welfare and education.        
    The CIS analyses the Abbott government’s crucial first budget, including significant changes in the key policy areas of health, tax measures, welfare and education.        
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  • Submission to the National Commission of Audit 01 April 2014 | T30.08
    The federal government’s Commission of Audit (CoA) was established in 2013 to review the performance and role of government. This publication is an edited version of the CIS submission to the CoA listing practical solutions aimed at cutting government expenditure. The government should adopt a dual approach to its review…...
    The federal government’s Commission of Audit (CoA) was established in 2013 to review the performance and role of government. This publication is an edited version of the CIS submission to the CoA listing practical solutions aimed at cutting government expenditure. The government should adopt a dual approach to its review…
    READ MORE
  • Emergency Budget Repair Kit 21 November 2013 | T30.05
    The new Abbott government should address its self-identified budget emergency by cutting wasteful spending now. Reducing government will also help prepare Australia for its future fiscal challenges. There are some simple steps that can move the budget back to surplus in the short term. The government should refocus its spending…...
    The new Abbott government should address its self-identified budget emergency by cutting wasteful spending now. Reducing government will also help prepare Australia for its future fiscal challenges. There are some simple steps that can move the budget back to surplus in the short term. The government should refocus its spending…
    READ MORE