What the Gonski 2 Review got wrong

Jennifer Buckingham, Blaise Joseph
17 June 2018 | PP6
What the Gonski 2 Review got wrong
  • The Gonski 2 Review into Australian schools failed to fulfill its terms of reference to examine the evidence regarding the most effective teaching and learning strategies, and to provide advice on how the extra federal government funding for schools should be used to improve student achievement.
  • Many of the Review’s recommendations are overly general and do not offer useful guidance for systems, educators or schools.
  • The evidence bases for significant and wide-reaching recommendations such as emphasising general capabilities, developing learning progressions, implementing an online assessment tool to measure individual learning, instilling ‘growth mindset’, and establishing an education evidence institute are not strong. The potential risks in each of these areas are not adequately discussed by the Review.
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