Government and Politics

With a belief in smaller government, The Centre for Independent Studies advocates policies that would limit the size of government in Australia.

In our research, we strive for policies that would reduce regulation and promote a healthy civil society, free of the burdens of big government.

How much government do we really want in Australia? How much government do we really need?

As an independent think tank, the CIS is positioned to seriously analyse the reach of big government, while emphasising freedom, responsibility and enterprise.

Featured Publication

Publications

Early Childhood Intervention: Assessing the evidence
Trisha Jha
20 September 2016 | Research Report 19

Early childhood interventions are programs that aim to improve a child’s development trajectory over the longer term. In the context of increasing disadvantage in welfare-dependent communities in Australia, governments spend considerable sums on these programs. The rationale is that investment, in theory, will reduce the…

Investor-State Arbitration and the Rule of Law: Debunking the Myths
Patrick Carvalho
13 April 2016 | Research Report 13

Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) is a legal provision in international agreements that enables foreign investors to take host states to an arbitral tribunal for alleged treaty breaches. The goal of investor-state arbitration is to provide a de-politicised, unbiased and law-based adjudication forum to guarantee the…

The myths of the generational bargain
Simon Cowan
01 March 2016 | Research Report 10

There has been a marked growth in pension cost and cohort. The percentage of people of retirement age has risen from less than 2% to almost 11% between 1911 and 2011, while the percentage of people receiving the pension has increased from around 30% to…

The myths of the generational bargain
Simon Cowan
01 March 2016 | Research Report 10

There has been a marked growth in pension cost and cohort. The percentage of people of retirement age has risen from less than 2% to almost 11% between 1911 and 2011, while the percentage of people receiving the pension has increased from around 30% to…

Magna Carta: Talisman of Liberty
Barry Maley
26 June 2015 | OP142

Eight hundred years ago, in 1215, an English king was confronted by rebellious barons – the great landholders of England – who demanded that his royal powers be curbed in favour of their liberties. Their Magna Carta (or ‘Great Charter’) listed their proposals. That singular…

Media & Commentary

Aussie exceptionalism
Jeremy Sammut
03 September 2016 | The Spectator

Only in Australia: The History, Politics and Economics of Australian Exceptionalism, Edited by William O. Coleman, Oxford University Press, RRP $69.95. It would have once been uncontroversial to suggest nations…

Three ways politics will change, whether Trump wins or not
Helen Andrews
18 March 2016 | Ideas@TheCentre

With Marco Rubio out of the race, the anti-Trump forces within the Republican Party are now more united than ever. Whether or not they prove able to stop Trump before…

John Hirst: culture warrior shaped future through the past
Jeremy Sammut
09 February 2016 | The Australian

The historian John Hirst was a giant of Australian intellectual life. Hirst, who died aged 73 in Melbourne last Friday had a long and distinguished academic career, including writing three…

Taxi hailing apps should compete on level playing field
Michael Potter
16 October 2015 | Ideas@TheCentre

The ACCC should focus on regulating monopolies and keep their nose out of regulating the details. The ihail app should be allowed, as long as taxi drivers aren’t prevented from…

What are we to do about Jeremy?
Peter Saunders
18 September 2015 | Ideas@TheCentre

In Britain, the Tories think all their Christmases have come at once.  Labour Party activists have overwhelmingly chosen as their new leader a Marxist, Jeremy Corbyn, who has the support…