Salvatore Babones

Adjunct Scholar

Salvatore Babones

Salvatore Babones is a political sociologist at the University of Sydney and an elected member of the National Committee on US-China Relations. His book The New Authoritarianism: Trump, Populism, and the Tyranny of Experts was named ‘Best on Politics 2018’ by the Wall Street Journal. Salvatore is also the author or co-author of six other books and more than two dozen academic research articles. His academic research takes a long-term approach to interpreting the structure of the global economy, with a particular focus on China. Salvatore has penned op-eds for the Australian, the Sydney Morning Herald, and the Australian Financial Review, and he writes regularly for Quadrant, Spectator Australia, Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, and The National Interest. Salvatore is currently researching a book on Western civilization.


Featured Publication

  • The China Student Boom and the Risks It Poses to Australian Universities 20 August 2019 | AP5
    Australia’s universities are taking a multi-million dollar gamble with taxpayer money to pursue a high-risk, high-reward international growth strategy. Their revenues are booming as they enrol record numbers of international students, particularly from China. As long as their bets on…...
    Australia’s universities are taking a multi-million dollar gamble with taxpayer money to pursue a high-risk, high-reward international growth strategy. Their revenues are booming as they enrol record numbers of international students, particularly from China. As long as their bets on…
    READ MORE

Media & Commentary

  • Time to round up neighbours to resist China 06 January 2020
    If you think the Great Barrier Reef is in trouble, spare a tear for Subi Reef in the Spratly Islands. In 2014 China started pumping perhaps millions of tonnes of sand from the bottom of the ocean on to this…
    If you think the Great Barrier Reef is in trouble, spare a tear for Subi Reef in the Spratly Islands. In 2014 China started pumping perhaps millions of tonnes of sand from the bottom of the ocean on to this…
    read more
  • Mandate from Heaven? 19 October 2019 | The National Interest
    When Chinese leader Mao Zedong died in 1976, Chinese communism perished with him. Mao had always suspected his successor, Deng Xiaoping, of being a “capitalist roader.” In a sense, he was right. It took a couple of years for Deng…
    When Chinese leader Mao Zedong died in 1976, Chinese communism perished with him. Mao had always suspected his successor, Deng Xiaoping, of being a “capitalist roader.” In a sense, he was right. It took a couple of years for Deng…
    read more
  • Uni lifts standards pinpointed in CIS paper 04 October 2019 | Ideas@TheCentre
    Some of Australia’s most prestigious universities are starting to make sensible changes when it comes to international student recruitment. In recent weeks, the University of Melbourne has eliminated language on its website that seemed to encourage international students to take…
    Some of Australia’s most prestigious universities are starting to make sensible changes when it comes to international student recruitment. In recent weeks, the University of Melbourne has eliminated language on its website that seemed to encourage international students to take…
    read more
  • How many international students are too many? 06 September 2019 | Ideas@TheCentre
    The CIS report ‘The China Student Boom and the Risks It Poses to Australian Universities’ presented the most complete picture to date of the number of Chinese university students in Australia (roughly 140,000) and the contributions they make to Australian…
    The CIS report ‘The China Student Boom and the Risks It Poses to Australian Universities’ presented the most complete picture to date of the number of Chinese university students in Australia (roughly 140,000) and the contributions they make to Australian…
    read more
  • Unis’ Chinese 'cash cows' 23 August 2019 | Ideas@TheCentre
    Australia’s universities are taking a multi-billion-dollar gamble with taxpayer money to pursue a high-risk, high-reward international growth strategy that may ultimately prove incompatible with their public service mission. Their revenues are booming as they enrol record numbers of international students,…
    Australia’s universities are taking a multi-billion-dollar gamble with taxpayer money to pursue a high-risk, high-reward international growth strategy that may ultimately prove incompatible with their public service mission. Their revenues are booming as they enrol record numbers of international students,…
    read more